#ThrowbackThursday

  • Photo submitted — George Page, of Hartwell, creator of the PBS documentary series Nature, was promoted to assistant to the president of PBS in 1972.
    Photo submitted — George Page, of Hartwell, creator of the PBS documentary series Nature, was promoted to assistant to the president of PBS in 1972.
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Jan. 6, 1972

A Hartwell native who created a popular environmental television show was named assistant to the President of the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS), a nationwide television network with 214 stations at the time. 

George Page, of Hartwell, was appointed by the president of PBS, Hartford N. Gunn Jr., and his role as assistant to the president became effective Jan. 1, 1972.

The Emory University graduate had a long career in broadcast journalism, reporting on stories for the “Today” show and the NBC nightly news, among others. His documentary, “The Young Americans,” was chosen as the official U.S. entry to the Edinburgh Film Festival in 1965 and he was listed in Outstanding Young Men of America in 1968.

Page would go on to create the PBS series “Nature”, which he hosted and narrated from its beginning in 1982 until his retirement in 1998.

 

Jan. 1, 1915

Even Hartwell had a “moving picture show” in 1915, and the admission prices were enough to make any modern-day moviegoer cringe.

The Sun reported that movies, a new industry just starting to gain popularity,  were being played in Hartwell every night that week and the crowds were large.

“The Perils of Pauline” was shown on several nights  and “it is getting more exciting each performance,” The  Sun reported.

So how much did the audience fork up to see the show? Admission at the time was 5 cents for a matinee show and 10 cents for the night show. Compare that to today’s average movie ticket price of $9.26.

 

Jan. 3, 1930

Moonshine was law enforcement’s target back in the day during the prohibition years.

Hart County Sheriff A.B. Brown and deputy C.L. Kay destroyed a 40-gallon still and 600 gallons of beer in the northwestern part of the county to close out 1929.

The outfit was reportedly no longer in operation.

The Hartwell Sun reported that this was just one of many successful raids that Hart County deputies had made in the past month.