#THROWBACK THURSDAY

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Taking a look back at Hartwell’s history as reported by The Hartwell Sun.

  • The front page from Jan. 13, 1972, featured a photograph of students getting ready for the Miss Hart County High pageant. Pictured are, kneeling, from left to right are, Anne Black and Becky McLane. Standing left to right are David Eaves, Hellen Dowis, Bobby Little, Beth Cacchioli and Debra Bagwell.
    The front page from Jan. 13, 1972, featured a photograph of students getting ready for the Miss Hart County High pageant. Pictured are, kneeling, from left to right are, Anne Black and Becky McLane. Standing left to right are David Eaves, Hellen Dowis, Bobby Little, Beth Cacchioli and Debra Bagwell.
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Jan. 5, 1951 — Selective Service drafted 15 Hart County men at the start of the year in 1951 during the Korean War.
The U.S. Army ordered 80,000 men be drafted due to an increasing need for manpower, The Hartwell Sun reported.
Officials said monthly quotas may increase as training facilities expanded.
During 1950, the Hart County Selective Service Board drafted 14 men in the county. The military called upon 450,000 men nationwide since September of 1950, all of whom were directed to the Army.

Jan. 13, 1933 — Influenza sickened Georgia, and the whole south, much like it does today.
A drastic increase in the number of flu cases was reported in The Hartwell Sun from a public health service report.
Georgia saw its number of flu cases increase from 2,429 to 3,954 in the period of a week, while states such as Louisiana and Arkansas saw the number of cases nearly double.
“The disease continued to have greatest prevalence in southern states, although all parts of the country had more of it than in the corresponding season last year,” The Sun reported.

Jan. 13, 1972 — Deer populations, as well as hunter participation, was on the rise in Georgia.
The Hartwell Sun reported that Georgia hunters bagged about 3,000 more deer in the 1971-72 season than in the previous season.
A game and fish department official said the increase in deer harvest did not indicate the deer herds were in any danger, rather, it means that the deer are increasing in numbers as are the number of hunters as well. Deer herds were moving into counties that formerly had no deer, The Sun reported.
The state’s deer population at the time was estimated to be 130,000, whereas today that number is about 1.27 million, according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.